Dentures

Dentures are designed to replace missing teeth.  Although no longer considered the optimum restorative solution, dentures are used in many cases.  If replacing all teeth in the mouth, the dentures are called Complete Dentures.  If used to replace some missing teeth, they are known as partial dentures.

Traditional complete dentures rest on the gums and rely on the bone for stability.  When teeth are missing, the bone tends to resorb and the jaw becomes thinner, providing a less stable base for the dentures.

Traditional partial dentures have clasps that help hold them in place using existing dentition but they still rest on the gum and the bone in the area of the missing teeth is subject to thinning out as well.

IMPLANT DENTURES

Dentures can be made that are supported by implants placed in the bone.

Removable implant supported dentures (Overdentures) are usually held in place by attaching over four implants.  Upper dentures made in this manner allow for the patient to not have the roof of their mouth (palate) covered with the plastic they would need in a conventional complete upper denture.  The result is a secure denture that will stay in place, not rock and allows for better biting into food.  Lower overdentures are accomplished by using two or four implants.  This is a wonderful solution for lower denture wearers as there is no suction available to hold complete lower dentures in; thereby always having to use adhesive and have the denture be loose and mobile.

Non-removable implant dentures may be an option for those patients who do not want to be taking their dentures out daily.  The patient will require having more implants placed and the denture will be attached (screwed) onto the implants.  The result leaves the patient with a more natural feeling bite as well as restoring chewing function and having the bone and teeth required to support a healthy jaw.